Vaginal Mesh Lawsuit Center Updates

Vaginal Mesh Use Complications

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Vaginal mesh complicationsMedical devices known as vaginal meshes, slings and other supplies considered for its efficient application have been scrutinized by the people in the wake of mounting consumer complaints.

Erosion of the mesh and infections occurring within a year following surgery are not the only complications of vaginal mesh application; other potential risks may also be observed while the procedure is ongoing. One of them is the possibility of a punctured bladder. Since the surgeon’s view is limited during the procedure, the bladder is most likely punctured by the needle during the stitching process. Most of the time, the bladder part on the opposite side of the doctor while he is doing the stitching is most likely cut. Women with previous operations on their reproductive system are prone to this complication as well. Letting the patient void of waste water before the operation and placing a urinary catheter into the bladder help lessen this problem. At the same time, doctors should be careful in safely guiding the needle when the stitching is performed.

Bleeding is another type of negative incidence that may happen while the positioning of the synthetic sling is done. This problem may emerge during the first cuts to the vaginal wall or the suturing of the sling. The doctor will then assess if there is a need for suture ligation, and this will be determined by how severe the bleeding is. For excessive bleeding, however, the vaginal wall should be closed and a vaginal gauze pack should be kept in place for hours until bleeding stops. If needed, blood transfusion may be done.

Prompt identification of these two potentially serious complications during surgery is essential for the patient’s fast recovery and safety. According to the clinical findings on post-surgical complications, unrecognized perforation of the bladder have led some patients to developing erosion of the mesh. Erosion of the mesh may be gravely dangerous, especially if there is a need to remove the mesh from the body, since there is a possibility for the body tissues surrounding it to be removed together with the mesh. Stripping the mesh device from the body would also mean removing some of the tissues attached in to it.

Artificial mesh devices and slings are the most advanced medical technology used in the repair of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Many people have shared successful experiences with these devices. However, there were also patients who acquired its complications. Even when many medical experts consider these devices as the best remedy for POP and SUI, surgical mesh sling cases are increasingly filed against mesh marketers.

References:

  • webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/news/20110713/fda-surgical-mesh-for-pelvic-prolapse-risky-unnecessary
  • laborie.com/articles/complications-of-synthetic-mid-urethral-slings
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One thought on “Vaginal Mesh Use Complications

  1. This is an important blog for anyone even remotely considering this procedure, it has it’s major flaws. About 2.5 years ago I was experiencing bladder incontinence, later, after I switched doctors, it was from a prolapsed uterus on the way. Anyway, this doctor suggested this mesh, he said it was the newest thing and will “hammock” my bladder….a red flag went thru my head. I told him I had to think about that and went home and did my research, everything in this blog was all there, in black and white, red flags everywhere saying….don’t do it!!! So I went back to my doctor and he was really gung ho to do this and I asked him if he read the FDA warning on the mesh, and how potentially life threatening and about the horrible side effects it could have….the look he gave me was priceless….he was floored, he had no idea that a patient would doubt his suggestion…he didn’t know a thing about the warning. I left that office and never returned. I found out within a few months, from a better doctor, that my uterus had prolapsed causing the leakage and a hysterectomy was performed within the week. I told my surgeon NOT to use any artificial sling or holster, but rather he said he was going to use my own muscle to hold up the bladder he agreed that artificial slings don’t work and your own tissue is best.

    Thank you thank you for sharing, I had all but forgotten how awful they could be.

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